Top 20 Food Allergies with Delayed Reactions

by Allergy Guy

When most people think food allergy, they think an immediate collapse to the floor, the face turning blue. Yes, this is one type of allergy, the sort everyone fears when they hear about a peanut allergy for example.

Possibly more common is the “delayed onset” food allergy, where symptoms do not appear for hours or even days. For example, when I eat wheat, I don’t notice any symptoms for about 24 hours. Some people might take two days before they feel anything. In rare cases, symptoms may not appear for a week.

This makes the job of determining what you are allergic to very difficult.

List of Common Allergens

Here are 20 of the most common allergenic foods:

If you think you might be suffering from a food allergy, but are not sure which food is causing the problem, start by cutting out all of the above foods.

Other foods commonly associated with allergic reactions (although not necessarily delayed) include:

  • Spinach
  • Shrimp
  • Oranges
  • Chicken
  • Strawberries
  • Tomato
  • Pork
  • Beef

See the related story Self-Testing for Allergies for a suggested approach.

Leave a Comment

{ 85 comments… read them below or add one }

1 michelle January 22, 2012 at 19:18

Thanx Terry….You told me alot of things that Ive recently learned from different sites and have been trying to do these things…..its all very good information for folks!! The process of figuring out what foods you have problems with is definately complicated and extensive, but Im sure that once I get it narrowed down, I will be a happy camper…….and Im on my way…:-)

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2 mark February 3, 2012 at 19:12

hello
my name is mark 54 years old I have given up dairy beans and
more I am having to many bowel movment s loose stool. now its time to give up gluten. I have had these issues for many years. I went to
doctor and told me I had giardia had stool tested. and a colonoscopy
irritated lining on small intestine. It has been 2 days no wheat

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3 Allergic to life... March 30, 2012 at 16:49

I have pretty much all the delayed allergies you can think of; corn, soy, wheat, cows milk, coffee!!!, tea, chocolate :( and many many more…
But in order to maintain sanity I had to take it one at a time. I ate wheat all the time and didn’t have too bad reactions, except when stressed, it felt like I was digesting knives! So after going Gluten free anytime I eat gluten now it’s turned into an immediate reaction. The same with all dairy products. I tested it out after going off dairy, ate some nachos, then reacted. :( oh well. But my symptoms were not as severe when I was eating them constantly. But I do have fibromyalgia. So once I went off of gluten and dairy my widespread pain improved sooo much! So it’s not always the swelling of the mouth, or the digestive problems when you eat foods you are allergic to, it can cause inflammation in your organs, tissues, and joints too! When your body takes in (even with lotions that have your allergens in it) it sends out a response to attack and you may feel it in different ways.

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4 Sarah May 18, 2012 at 19:06

I think I may have a delayed allergic reaction to flaxseed. When I think back to the first time I started having stomachaches and nausea, it was about a day since I last had flaxseed (or flax oil in my triple omega capsule). The next time I ate some, I had a stomachache within a few hours. Two days later, I believe I had some for breakfast, followed by a stomachache a few hours later at church, so bad I could barely sing the songs in the service. I would eat flaxseed with my breakfast and take the triple omega capsule at lunch. I can remember a couple of times getting the bad stomachaches sometime in the afternoon and even in the evening. When I went to my doctor for my annual physical, about mid-March, my blood test results showed my eosinophil levels at 40%. I was instructed to stop everything new I’d started consuming in the past year. I’d begun to suspect the flaxseed when I remembered it was something I’d started consuming regularly a few months before, but I pretty much narrowed it down for sure after I’d stopped everything and started feeling better after a few days. Then, I had some toast for breakfast with Smart Balance buttery spread, and I started to have abdominal symptoms. I ended up going to an allergist to confirm a flax allergy, but the RAST they did didn’t show anything abnormal with the flaxseed. Could the fact that the reaction isn’t immediate or extremely severe affect the result of the RAST? My allergist did say I may have had eosinophilic gastroenteritis. I have since started back all the supplements and food I was using before, except for the flaxseed and triple omega with the flax oil, and I’ve not had the abdominal symptoms. I even found a triple omega capsule without flax oil, Arctic Naturals Total Omega. :-) I had my eosinophil levels tested again in early April, and they were normal. They’ll be tested again at the end of this month, and I expect them to be normal then as well.

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5 Allergy Guy May 20, 2012 at 12:25

The most important allergy test you can take is noticing how you feel with our without the suspected allergen. By this test, you KNOW you are allergic to flax, which proves my next point: allergy tests are not accurate. They can be helpful guides but they can also mislead.

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6 Dan June 19, 2012 at 06:06

I think i may be allergic to squid/calamari …or something in the cooking process at chinese restaurants. Last year i had a reaction to what i thought was squid.. 2 days after eating it i suffered an itchy rash all over my body,the rash developed in to little tiny boils which itched like mad..on my eyelids,lips,finger and face ,were the worst affected areas.
A few weeks ago i ate squid again…from the very same restaurant..approx 2 days later the rash started to appear..within two hours of noticing it ,it was full blown..but maybe 2 or 3 times as bad..my face swelled up this time as well as the rash turning into small boils again…my skin was sore to the touch and hot. Im not so sure it is actually the squid or if an added ingredient to the squid like MSG or something else altogether. I had to go to work with this outbreak,drive 600 miles and perform shows for the public,i wasnt pretty to look at and would do anything to find out exactly what it is,doing this to me. My GP wont send me to an allergy specialist until i get it again…..i would like to never get it again as next time could be quite dangerous. Any suggestions?

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7 Allergy Guy June 19, 2012 at 09:54

I don’t think much of your GP’s advice. Any chance you can either find a new GP, or get an appointment with an allergist directly, without a referral?

On the other hand, allergy testing is not all that accurate. It may help find out if it’s squid you’re allergic to or something else like MSG, but it may not.

If you really want to know if it’s squid or not, you can try it at a restaurant of different ethnicity with a very simple preparation, or buy it fresh and prepare it yourself. I can see why you wouldn’t want to risk that. So it looks like you’ll just have to avoid it.

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8 Kate December 1, 2012 at 13:07

Could be that they’re frying the calamari in oil that’s been used to fry something else that you’re actually allergic to.

If you’re very concerned and can’t see an allergist make sure you carry around Benadryl with you. I am highly allergic to shellfish and never leave the house without my epi pen and two antihistamines (diphenhydramine and ranitidine). An epi pen only buys you time to get to a hospital where from my experience I’m always first given diphenhydramine (either as a shot or p.o. if I can manage it).

Avoidance is the best possible thing to do in your situation if you’ve had a reaction but aren’t sure as to what. If your breathing has become compromised during one of these attacks you could ask about an epi pen, but they’re very expensive and only buy you time to get yourself to a hospital. I hope that in the intervening time you’ve since managed to have a better conversation with your doctor and have come up with a plan to your mutual satisfaction.

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9 Susie June 25, 2012 at 02:53

I have two separate questions I am hoping for some guidance with, if anyone has ideas.
First, I am wondering about serving popcorn to a large group and what oils I should avoid. Obviously, peanut oil is out, but what about coconut oil, sunflower oil….other oils? I could obviously use corn oil, since no one is going to go for popcorn if they’re allergic to corn. Any suggestions or info?
Completely separately, I am wondering if anyone else has experienced an allergy to kale. I happen to love kale, but if I eat it, I suffer (from 8-24 hours later) severe cramps, chills, diarrhea, nausea, exhaustion….I feel like I have the flu. I get none of these symptoms from anything else in the kale family. And it doesn’t matter if it’s cooked, raw, baked, whatever. I have searched the internet for this, but I can’t seem to find any other accounts that are JUST kale. Help?

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10 T Moore January 25, 2013 at 20:07

Why not do air popped popcorn? No oils just corn.

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11 Virginia February 26, 2013 at 19:50

Just put the kernels in a brown paper bag. It’s a matter of trial and error in order to know how many minutes it takes to be done in your microwave oven.
I found your post when I was searching about reactions to Kale. This is the first time I try it in a coleslaw and I think I have some kind of allergic reaction.

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12 Reva March 18, 2013 at 06:30

Hi Susie,

I was just looking up allergies to kale and came across your post – I have virtually the same symptoms when I eat it, not always but often. I’ve had all these other tests to see what could be causing my stomach problems- but I think it is just the reaction to the kale. If you find any more from your Dr. please post it!

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13 Jean March 22, 2013 at 21:29

I’ve been looking up kale allergies as well. I’ve eaten kale twice in my life. I made baked kale crisps and woofed them down one evening. Within hours I was nauseous, had stomach/intestinal cramps, achy muscles, and a fever of 101 degrees. A few weeks later I ate some kale in the school cafeteria and soon after experienced severe intestinal pains, achy muscles, and a fever of 100 degrees. Because I never get sick I was able to narrow down the reason I was sick was due to eating kale!!! Crazy. I’ve never heard of a kale allergy, but it’s good knowing others have experienced the same thing.

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14 Paula January 8, 2014 at 16:53

I have taken on eating raw kale as a snack and about 30 mins later it becomes hard to breathe and my throat gets all itchy. Not cool. :(

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15 Anna September 26, 2012 at 19:16

Hi, I am studying at Massey University, in New Zealand – doing a project and am wondering if your ‘top 20 food allergies’ list from is based on your own research or gathered from elsewhere?

My project requires me to choose a group of people (those with food allergies/intolerances) and create something to help them. I personally have had a food allergy that has meant I’ve been in A&E twice – so I’m keen to create something that will actually work.
On a side note: if anyone is reading this and has a food allergy or intolerance and has a few minutes to answer my 10 question survey… you will find it by clicking here: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/XSVLR68

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16 Dave October 1, 2012 at 10:42

I recently added flaxseed and kyo-green to my diet included with some fruits and fruit juice to make a breakfast drink. I noticed a raised rash appear on the inside of my arms and around my neck. It is not itchy and does not cause me any discomfort, but concerns me. I stopped making the shakes but have not allowed enough time for the rash to clear. (two days) I got a similar rash from Lamisil several years ago. I guess I will know soon enough, but is this kind of reaction common to Flaxseed or Kyo-green?

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17 Jerry Kaschak January 17, 2013 at 12:01

My name is Jerry,i am a 50 year old man who has recently given up wheat, gluten, and sugar. My body is experiencing rashes in my lymph node areas such as arm pits, and groin, I have also come down with little water blisters on my fingers
in clusters. My new food regiment is fresh organic fruits, vegetables, and lean meats, I have also added hearbal tea’s , black sesame seeds and olive oil.

Does anyone have a suggestion to why the rashes are occurring? It sounds like to me my body is lashing out to something I am eating. Do you think the hearbal tea or sesame seeds are the problem?

Thank you for your response.

Sincerely,

Jerry K

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18 George September 20, 2014 at 05:08

Hey Jerry

I’ve had the same problem, its your liver rejected certain foods. I had the same problem and saw all the doctors. Then met a herbal doctor, he said you should eat foods to your blood type only. There’s a book ” Eat right to your blood type” read it

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19 Lyn January 23, 2013 at 22:49

I am 42 years old and allergic to chicken, tomatoes, and shrimp. There aren’t many foods without the content of chicken or tomatoes.
I am constantly reading labels. My family loves chicken and I can’t stand the scent of them cooking it without my throat closing up. Also, the same thing happens with tomatoes and shrimp. Benadryl does not help much anymore, my system is so immune to it. Is there another over counter medication, that I can use?

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20 Betty February 22, 2013 at 12:07

I have been dealing with my issues for a year now. Recently realized I was dealing with both H1 and H2 reactions. To block both I have to take two Zantac and two Zyrtec (generic is fine as long as the ingredients are the same. It helps somewhat, but is not a cure to the problem.

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21 elizabeth ervin April 6, 2013 at 16:35

what can i eat, if i am allegeric to wheat, corn, soybean, peanuts, and shrimps

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22 Allergy Guy April 9, 2013 at 22:03

See for some ideas.

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23 April April 13, 2013 at 10:44

Don’t forget sugar intolerances! often cane sugar, but sometimes just all sugars! :S

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24 Allergy Guy April 17, 2013 at 18:20

Yes, but where does sugar allergy rank in frequency against other allergies? I don’t believe it’s in the top 20. On the other hand, too much sugar is a leading cause of many diseases, so it is important to think about.

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25 Kyousuke April 15, 2013 at 12:11

I’ve been looking at this forum quite intently. This is the first place I’ve heard of delayed-reaction allergies. This is important as I’m dealing with a custody case where my 18-month-old son, who I see on every other weekend, is supposedly and consistently reacting to something that is causing massive diarrhea, vomiting, and rashes. The trouble is that he exhibits none of these symptoms in the 39 hour period that he’s with me. This has supposedly been happening for the last two months with absolutely no reaction whatsoever that I’ve been able to observe, yet I’m told he’s reacting rather violently to something I’m giving him.

The list of allergens you gave are all things that he either has at both houses or at neither house, with oatmeal being the one exception. I considered cutting out the oatmeal, but given that he eats a wide array of things with me and on most weekends, he may eat completely different things from the previous, how could I, assuming an allergy, track down the offending allergen.

And sorry for making this so long. :)

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26 Allergy Guy April 17, 2013 at 18:32

I would suggest you find out what he is eating the rest of the time, and try to follow that diet as closely as possible. Then you can start to add other foods and see what happens.

It is also possible that it is not an allergy and has nothing to do with food, such as stress or some other factor. Or who knows, maybe something he usually eats just before he leaves for your place? Can you cooperate to keep a food log at both households and see if that helps? Write down what he eats and when.

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27 ken german April 18, 2013 at 11:09

I believe we have identified my daughters cause for the delayed allergic reaction to meat. It seems as if it was caused by a tick bite. And the tick was called a Lone Star tick. Apparently there has been a great increase in these cases along the east coast centered around the southern pa., virginia, maryland, and delaware states.
So what do we do now? eat an awful lot of chicken.

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28 Allergy Guy April 18, 2013 at 22:45

I’m sorry to hear about your daughter’s tick-induced delayed anaphylaxis.

Eating chicken all the time must get a bit boring. Perhaps you could eat more fish?

Good luck

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29 kmomma January 19, 2014 at 02:01

Hi, we eat a lot of ground chicken and flavor it with beef granules or Italian seasonings for sausage. you would have to check the ingredients on the granules to see if there is anything she cannot have. Good luck

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30 Md.Ali Hossain. January 22, 2014 at 12:26

Dear Sir, I have mucus last (15)Fifteen Years, I took so many medicine & examination many things but not find out anything
My Mucus also not going I think now maybe allergy For Food, Please try to Help me and Answer to by E-mail

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31 Allergy Guy February 7, 2014 at 22:01

I wouldn’t assume it is an allergy. Milk and milk products are mucus-forming so you might try cutting out dairy products and see if that helps.

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32 Elizabeth February 2, 2014 at 07:30

After my food allegery test I was found to be allegeric to corn, soy, shellfish, nuts, and wheat. After eliminating this items from my diet my skin has improve and I am now more comfortable in my skin. However I need to deal with all my environmental allegories. As of now my sinus are killing me, and I have become tissue girl. All because I refuse to take the injections weekly. :(

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33 Allergy Guy February 7, 2014 at 22:10

Well, you might consider taking the injections :)
Also, watch out for allergens such as dust, mold, pet dander, pollen etc.

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34 marynethercutt August 28, 2014 at 18:32

I would like any information on childrens food allergies.I have 2 grand sons , 1 had food allergies as a young child .
I think he still has them .
Because he’s now getting sick again, and no one know why anymore.

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35 George September 18, 2014 at 05:33

Hi

Saw my Herbal doctor about 6 month’s ago about my dermatitis .
He basically told me to eliminate wheat gluten and dairy, also should stick to my blood diet. This has stop my itching, However now I have developed Cirrhosis and Doc explained that I had to much yeast in my body which can be caused by eating fruits with yeast on them. I’ve noticed that I have been having a lot of smoothies , i.e. blueberrys with almond milk and a bananas. I might have about 3 to 4 smoothies a day. Is this causing my yeast build up? Are blueberries and bananas , causing me harm

If you could get back to me

Regards

George

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36 Allergy Guy September 18, 2014 at 14:24

I can’t say anything for sure, but suggest that if yeast is a problem, then blueberries not only have sugar, but may have yeast growing on the skin. You might be better with bananas, strawberries, raspberries and that sort of thing. You’ll still have a fair bit of sugar, so I suggest you avoid too much sugar or refined carbohydrates. See Gluten Free Foods for Gluten Allergy and Celiac and Gluten Free Recipes for some ideas.

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