Barley

by Allergy Guy

 

Barley

 

barley

Of the main cereal crops (wheat, barley,oats and rye), barley is probably the least commonly used in day-to-day food. It is often used to make beer and whisky.

As a food, barley is most often used in soups and stews. In Asia, is boiled to make barley water, a popular drink which is ideal for hot weather.

Barley can grow in cold conditions, which is why it is a staple crop in Tibet (they also grow wheat there, so if you are allergic to wheat, Tibet is not actually a perfect destination for you).

Barley is a flavorful, tasty, chewy grain. It can be cooked like rice and served on the side with meat and vegetable dishes, much like rice.

Health Risks

Barley contains gluten and must be avoided if you are celiac or allergic to barley.

If you are allergic to wheat, you may still be able to eat barley (I do).

If you have just discovered that you are allergic to wheat, it is best to eliminate barley from your diet for several months, then re-introduce it to see if it causes you trouble or not.

Health Benefits

Barley is a good source of fiber, selenium, phosphorus, copper and manganese.

Barley Relatives

Barley is a grass. Besides being related to your lawn and bamboo, grass is also related to the following food crops because they too are grasses:

Wheat
Maize (Corn)
Oats
Rice
Rye
Sorghum
Millet
Sugarcane


Nutritional Information

Barley, pearled, cooked

Refuse: 0%
Scientific Name:
NDB No: 20006 (Nutrient values and weights are for edible portion)

 

Nutrient Units Value per
100 grams
Number
of Data
Points
Std.
Error
1.00 X 1 cup
——-
157g
Proximates
Water
g

 

68.80

 

5

 

2.514

 

108.02

 

Energy
kcal

 

123

 

0

 

 
193

 

Energy
kj

 

515

 

0

 

 
809

 

Protein
g

 

2.26

 

4

 

0.151

 

 

3.55

 

Total lipid (fat)
g

 

0.44

 

5

 

 

0.058

 

0.69

 

Ash
g

 

0.27

 

 

5

 

0.011

 

0.42

 

Carbohydrate, by difference
g

 

28.22

 

0

 

 
44.31

 

Fiber, total dietary
g

 

3.8

 

0

 

 
6.0

 

Sugars, total
g

 

0.28

 

0

 

 
0.44

 

Minerals
Calcium, Ca
mg

 

11

 

4

 

2.387

 

17

 

Iron, Fe
mg

 

1.33

 

5

 

0.331

 

2.09

 

Magnesium, Mg
mg

 

22

 

5

 

2.16

 

 

35

 

Phosphorus, P
mg

 

54

 

5

 

 

2.338

 

85

 

Potassium, K
mg

 

93

 

 

5

 

21.316

 

146

 

Sodium, Na
mg

 

3

 

1

 

 
5

 

Zinc, Zn
mg

 

0.82

 

5

 

0.125

 

1.29

 

Copper, Cu
mg

 

 

0.105

 

5

 

0.032

 

0.165

 

Manganese, Mn 

mg

 

0.259

 

2

 

 
0.407

 

Selenium, Se
mcg

 

8.6

 

0

 

 
13.5

 

Vitamins
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
mg

 

0.0

 

0

 

 
0.0

 

Thiamin
mg

 

0.083

 

4

 

0.017

 

0.130

 

Riboflavin
mg

 

0.062

 

3

 

0.002

 

0.097

 

Niacin
mg

 

 

2.063

 

3

 

0.63

 

3.239

 

Pantothenic acid 

mg

 

0.135

 

3

 

0.063

 

0.212

 

Vitamin B-6
mg

 

0.115

 

3

 

0.032

 

0.181

 

Folate, total
mcg

 

16

 

3

 

8.849

 

 

25

 

Folic acid
mcg

 

0

 

0

 

 

 

0

 

Folate, food
mcg

 

16

 

3

 

8.849

 

25

 

Folate, DFE
mcg_DFE

 

16

 

0

 

 
25

 

Vitamin B-12
mcg

 

0.00

 

0

 

 
0.00

 

Vitamin B-12, added
mcg

 

0.00

 

0

 

 
0.00

 

Vitamin A, IU
IU

 

7

 

0

 

 
11

 

Vitamin A, RAE
mcg_RAE

 

0

 

0

 

 
0

 

Retinol
mcg

 

0

 

0

 

 
0

 

Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)
mg

 

0.01

 

0

 

 
0.02

 

Vitamin E, added
mg

 

0.00

 

0

 

 
0.00

 

Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
mcg

 

0.8

 

0

 

 
1.3

 

Lipids
Fatty acids, total saturated
g

 

0.093

 

0

 

 
0.146

 

4:0 

g

 

0.000

 

0

 

 
0.000

 

6:0
g

 

0.000

 

0

 

 
0.000

 

8:0
g

 

0.000

 

0

 

 
0.000

 

10:0
g

 

0.000

 

0

 

 
0.000

 

12:0
g

 

0.001

 

0

 

 
0.002

 

14:0
g

 

0.002

 

0

 

 
0.003

 

16:0
g

 

0.079

 

0

 

 
0.124

 

18:0
g

 

0.003

 

0

 

 
0.005

 

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated
g

 

0.057

 

0

 

 
0.089

 

16:1 undifferentiated
g

 

0.001

 

0

 

 
0.002

 

18:1 undifferentiated
g

 

0.047

 

0

 

 
0.074

 

20:1
g

 

0.000

 

0

 

 
0.000

 

22:1 undifferentiated
g

 

0.000

 

0

 

 
0.000

 

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated
g

 

0.214

 

0

 

 
0.336

 

18:2 undifferentiated
g

 

0.193

 

0

 

 
0.303

 

18:3 undifferentiated
g

 

0.021

 

0

 

 
0.033

 

18:4
g

 

0.000

 

0

 

 
0.000

 

20:4 undifferentiated
g

 

0.000

 

0

 

 
0.000

 

20:5 n-3
g

 

0.000

 

0

 

 
0.000

 

22:5 n-3
g

 

0.000

 

0

 

 
0.000

 

22:6 n-3
g

 

0.000

 

0

 

 
0.000

 

Cholesterol
mg

 

0

 

0

 

 
0

 

Amino acids
Tryptophan
g

 

0.038

 

0

 

 
0.060

 

Threonine
g

 

0.077

 

0

 

 
0.121

 

Isoleucine
g

 

0.083

 

 

0

 

 
0.130

 

Leucine
g

 

0.154

 

0

 

 
0.242

 

Lysine
g

 

0.084

 

0

 

 
0.132

 

Methionine
g

 

0.043

 

0

 

 
0.068

 

Cystine
g

 

0.050

 

0

 

 
0.079

 

Phenylalanine
g

 

0.127

 

0

 

 
0.199

 

Tyrosine
g

 

0.065

 

0

 

 
0.102

 

Valine
g

 

0.111

 

0

 

 
0.174

 

Arginine
g

 

0.113

 

0

 

 
0.177

 

Histidine
g

 

0.051

 

0

 

 
0.080

 

Alanine
g

 

0.088

 

0

 

 
0.138

 

Aspartic acid
g

 

0.141

 

0

 

 
0.221

 

Glutamic acid
g

 

0.591

 

0

 

 
0.928

 

Glycine
g

 

0.082

 

0

 

 
0.129

 

Proline
g

 

0.269

 

0

 

 
0.422

 

Serine
g

 

0.095

 

0

 

 
0.149

 

Other
Alcohol, ethyl
g

 

0.0

 

0

 

 
0.0

 

Caffeine 

mg

 

0

 

0

 

 
0

 

Theobromine
mg

 

0

 

0

 

 
0

 

Carotene, beta
mcg

 

5

 

0

 

 
8

 

Carotene, alpha
mcg

 

0

 

0

 

 
0

 

Cryptoxanthin, beta
mcg

 

0

 

0

 

 
0

 

Lycopene
mcg

 

0

 

0

 

 
0

 

Lutein + zeaxanthin
mcg

 

56

 

0

 

 
88

 

 

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 19 (2006)




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Leave a Comment

{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Irene July 16, 2013 at 03:03

I went to a lovely restaurant last night. I have Coeliac disease with lactose intolerance. I had told them before I visited and they pointed out what I could have from the menu. One of the recommendations was barley risotto! They convinced me that it was gluten free barley so I ate and enjoyed the dish. However, I have had the usual reaction to gluten!! Before I point out their error on the menu (it is marked n the menu as GF), is it possible to get gluten free barley and therefore I have had a reaction to something else???

Reply

2 Allergy Guy July 31, 2013 at 11:54

Barely contains gluten. Period. There is debate about oats, but not barely. The people at the restaurant are misinformed.
I know it’s hard, but you have to be sure of yourself and if in doubt, leave it out, no matter how nice and confident the restaurant staff are! It sure is frustrating though when you get led astray (this has happened to me many times over the years and I have finally learned my lesson).

Reply

3 Greg February 7, 2012 at 13:02

I was diagnosed with a Barley allergy after a recent allergy test. My health has been in rapid decline, I’m a 33 yo male. I can’t get away from Barley and I’m very frustrated. It’s in almost all store bought bread, all wheat flour mixes, all cereal, and many seasonings I enjoy. This allergy is destroying my life. If anyone knows good resources to find non-barley foods, please share. I have to make everything myself now.

Reply

4 Allergy Guy February 7, 2012 at 15:54

Gluten-free should be barley-free. It may be unnecessarily restrictive, but would be a good first step, other than home-made items, until you can find suitable replacements of your favourite foods.

The good new is that making everything yourself leads to much healthier food. It is time consuming though.

Reply

5 Penny July 15, 2011 at 08:40

My son is allergic to soy and malt barley Is there a bread i can buy without soy and barley?

Reply

6 Liz June 3, 2010 at 14:09

You didn’t answer my question – does barley cause loose bowels?

Reply

7 Allergy Guy June 3, 2010 at 15:15

Hi Liz,

If you have celiac disease, or you’re allergic to barley, it may cause loose bowels. Depends on the person.

Reply

8 stephanie December 19, 2008 at 00:29

barley allergy

I just read this article, and although I am thankful for the information provided, I have been researching and eliminating barley from my son’s diet for two and a half years now (he is four), because he was diagnosed with a barley allergy at a year and a half old. The thing I find misleading about your article, is that you say barley is probably the least commonly used in everyday foods, of all the grains you listed. I find this to be misleading because barley is really in a lot of places one might not suspect. While it is very commonly found in beer or whiskey, and that is kind of a known, it is also very commonly found in everyday foods like bread, cereal, cookies, etc. The main reason for this is that most flour that you buy in the grocery store, lists malted barley flour as one of the main ingredients. Because of FDA requirements on labeling, companies are not neccessarily required to specifically list that the flour they used to make their bread contains malted barley flour. Nor do most labels tell you that malt is made from barley (always), and/or corn. I find barley in almost as many things as I find wheat in. Although I can’t seem to find anything on it right now, when I first started researching barley, I was finding that dextrose and maltodextrin are sometimes derived from barley (most often from corn, maize, rice, etc) as well. Those are two sweeteners that are in everything. Anyhow, thank you for the information you provided, I hope you found this information helpful as well.

Reply

9 Allergy Guy September 10, 2010 at 19:07

I see your point.

It is certainly less common than wheat, but just as sneaky.

In the end, it doesn’t really matter if a particular ingredient is less or more common than another; if you’re allergic to it, watch out for it everywhere!

Reply

10 Anonymous October 9, 2008 at 18:10

barley allergies

What are other names given to barley that you should watch out for on ingredient lists?

Reply

11 admin October 11, 2008 at 21:42

Avoid Malt

The main one I am aware of is malt or words similar to malt. Malting is a process, usually applied to barley, so if you see malt it usually means malted barely.

Reply

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