Latex in Clothes | Latex Allergy | Allergy

Latex in Clothes

by Guest Writer

If you have a latex allergy, be aware that latex may be present in some cloths, as described below.

Melanie explains her research in to cloths that might contain latex:

Greetings,
In regard to Hannah’s question about clothing containing latex- yes some clothing does contain natural latex.

If you look at for example socks at Kohl’s it will even list a small percentage natural rubber or latex. Elastic is natural latex usually, but is never listed on the material content. Concerning Spandex companies that make clothes can introduce natural latex into that spandex during the processing so you have to be cautious. I have contacted many clothing companies and found that they will not list “latex free” because they protect themselves from liability in the event natural latex has been added. Those companies may be located here in the Unites Sates, but their products are made out side of the US.

To give you an example I recently wrote a letter to the NIKE CEO asking why they do not commit themselves into saying latex free running shoes as a lot of sneaker soles are no longer made of natural latex or the adhesive glue is latex free? I never got a response although I sent the letter registered and I know he received it.

With that said I steer away from Spandex due to not knowing totally the whole makeup of what it contains. It is extremely frustrating for us who have the allergy to not know what products contain so we can protect ourselves. Even the FDA says lean on the cautious side when a product says latex free because it may not be.

Where does that leave us who have latex allergies or any allergy for that matter? It is dangerous and in this great time of great technology you would think somehow these companies would be so more advanced. I recall talking to Victoria Secret and asking them about their clothes. Not one of them even knew where their products were produced and didn’t even know what the elastic was made of. I asked how you can sell a product and not know what you are selling! It is very scary for us who have allergies!

Elastics in clothing may not be a problem for some people, depending on how the clothing is made, how sensitive you are, and how old the elastic is. Often, elastics are threaded through a tunnel of folded over cloth. A new elastic may not release enough latex through the clothing to effect people who aren’t very sensitive. However as the clothing ages and the elastic breaks down, this could become a problem even for less sensitive people.

What is your experience with latex allergy and clothing? Please leave a comment.

See also: Products Containing Latex article.

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{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Jan October 20, 2018 at 23:51

I am not only sensitive to latex but also latex foods and clothing not to mention basic grooming items. The majority of clothes today are man made fabrics which are constructed using bamboo (latex/rubber family). My first breakout was 15 years ago from a shirt given to me as a gift; it was 98% cotton with the 2% being viscose around the neck. It took 3 weeks of 3 doses a day of an antihistamine to cure the hives on my neck.

Right now I am having difficulty finding pants for work as most are a blend of cotton and rayon. If I can stay below 40% rayon in the pants, the reaction is minimal. Forget the combination in my tops. I have a few tops that are polyester that I manage to wear but most have to be 100% cotton. In less than 5 minutes it causes itching so bad that I want to rake my skin off.

Underwear and socks are a problem. While I seem to do ok with bras, panties cause me to break out in sores on my backside and I believe cause yeast infection. Socks I break out in hives on my ankles.

Several years ago I had to change panty liners brand as I was breaking out in blisters (where as a woman you never want to have a blister and most certainly not more than one) from the adhesive. While I was searching for a new brand I started up with the yeast infections. Doesn’t matter if the panties have a cotton crotch.

Many of your personal grooming products contain latex/rubber family ingredients in their products. I am highly sensitive to coconut, which I have so far found 34 ingredient names. Many products use coconut and avocado as moisturizing ingredients. Anything that suds (soap, shampoos, cleaners) contain coconut.

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2 Jerry hemby July 6, 2018 at 00:32

yes socks, underwear, pressure stockings etc. turn socks inside out will usually help. underwear, men change to boxers (all cloth) will still have latex in band but those too may be turned inside out. all bandages, tapes have latex.

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3 Crissie Cirelli October 18, 2017 at 21:35

I have a pair of PJ Couture booties with the sweater type cuff band around the top. Does this product have latex in it? My legs have began to itch around the area of the cuffs.

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4 Karen August 6, 2017 at 17:49

I know of some underwear containing latex. Surprisingly it is in the material itself. I steer away from undergarments with elastic in the legs or exposed in the waistline. (When I was a child my mother would sew fabric blanket tape over the elastic on all my clothing. Is a great idea for items you just love ) I have bought some clothing that resulted in swollen tender inflamed skin and out breaks of whelping and blister like skin irritation. Resulting in painful sores and redness lasting over a week on my buttocks and hip area. The blistered areas go deep. And extremely painful. Thank God the crotch is cotton. ( Always buy undergarments with a cotton crotch panel)The latex has to be in the material. These are usually the stretchy, thin, silky feeling underwear. But I have bought some that feel like cotton, cotton blend (the blend ingredients are not mentioned) that resulted in the same misery. I have thought it might be wise to wrap it around my waist and test it out first?? Out of desperation.
Socks are a huge issue. Once again it is blended into the fabric. Even if it states 100% cotton.

I went to a Doctor a couple of years to get an annual routine female check up done. I ask Everytime about the exam gloves. To ensure they are not latex. The nurse either did not care or did not know or just lied. Turns out they were latex. I suffered for over a month. I no longer see that Doctor and gave her scorching revues on every online review I could find. I now ask the doctor ( not nurses or associates) Everytime I visit before they touch me if the gloves have any latex. I make certain they understand that if there is the results will be whelping and blistering everywhere they touch me. They leave and check.
Be careful.
Make certain they are not only aware of the allergy but remind people you have already told. They are human and forget or just do not take the time to review.
I have had eye doctors tell me contacts do not contain latex only to have my eyes swell shut after 10-15 minutes. Turns out they are processed in a fluid containing latex. Sigh…
If anyone knows of a contacts mfg that has zero latex in the lense or manufacturering process. I would love to know.

I am wondering, are their any types of furniture that contains latex?
Bonded leathers? Or even the cloth covered?
Recently I started getting a rash similar to what I get when exposed to latex on the backs of my upper arms. One arm worse than the other. I think it maybe due to my skin getting hot next to our ” bonded leather” furniture. I have been careful lately to put a throw over the back of the chair. The rash is going away. The skin on my upper arms is more sensitive. My legs are exposed but I have zero rash on them.
The set never gave me issues prior but it is getting older. So could it be the material breaking down with my sweat and body heat? Or the heat and sweat are causing my skin to absorb it maybe??

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